04:29 pm, blithewine
1 note
quote
Digestive cheese and fruit there sure will be;
But that which most doth take my muse and me,
Is a pure cup of rich Canary wine,
Which is the Mermaid’s now, but shall be mine;
Of which had Horace or Anacreon tasted,
Their lives, as do their lines, till now had lasted.
Ben Jonson, “Inviting a Friend to Supper”

04:17 pm, blithewine
6 notes
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The Lady of Shalott, 1905 William Holman Hunt

The Lady of Shalott, 1905 
William Holman Hunt


12:47 pm, blithewine
7 notes
quote
O there is nothing like fine weather, and health, and Books, and a fine country, and a contented Mind, and Diligent-habit of reading and thinking, and an amulet against the ennui — and, please heaven, a little claret-wine cool out of a cellar a mile deep…
John Keats in a letter to Fanny Keats, 1 May 1819

12:44 pm, blithewine
2 notes
quote
[I]t was during those tranquil evenings with Sebastian that I first made a serious acquaintance with wine and sowed the seed of that rich harvest which was to be my stay in many barren years. We would sit, he and I, in the Painted Parlour with three bottles open on the table and three glasses before each of us; Sebastian had found a book on wine-tasting, and we followed its instructions in detail. We warmed the glass slightly at a candle, filled it a third high, swirled the wine round, nursed it in our hands, held it to the light, breathed it, sipped it, filled our mouths with it, and rolled it over the tongue, ringing it on the palate like a coin on a counter, tilted our heads back and let it trickle down the throat. Then we talked of it and nibbled Bath Oliver biscuits, and passed on to another wine; then back to the first, then on to another, until all three were in circulation and the order of glasses got confused, and we fell out over which was which, and we passed the glasses to and fro between us until there were six glasses, some of them with mixed wines in them which we had filled from the wrong bottle, till we were obliged to start again with three clean glasses each, and the bottles were empty and our praise of them wilder and more exotic.
‘… It is a little, shy wine like a gazelle.’
‘Like a leprechaun.’
‘Dappled, in a tapestry meadow.’
‘Like a flute by still water.’
‘… And this is a wise old wine.’
‘A prophet in a cave.’
‘… And this is a necklace of pearls on a white neck.’
‘Like a swan.’
‘Like the last unicorn.’
And we would leave the golden candlelight of the dining-room for the starlight outside and sit on the edge of the fountain, cooling our hands in the water and listening drunkenly to its splash and gurgle over the rocks.
‘Ought we to be drunk every night?’ Sebastian asked one morning.
‘Yes, I think so.’
‘I think so too.’
Evelyn Waugh, Brideshead Revisited

12:43 pm, blithewine
2 notes
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Pistols, Engraved and Inlaid with Damascene Work
Industrial Arts of the Nineteenth Century, 1851

Pistols, Engraved and Inlaid with Damascene Work

Industrial Arts of the Nineteenth Century, 1851


11:10 am, blithewine
5 notes
quote
This morning Poetry has conquered — I have relapsed into those abstractions which are my only life — I feel escaped from a new strange and threatening sorrow. — And I am thankful for it — There is an awful warmth about my heart like a load of Immortality.
John Keats in a letter to J. H. Reynolds, 22 September 1818

09:17 pm, blithewine
8 notes
quote

She halted at the gateway, telling
The housekeeper a slow good-bye;
And came to the abandoned dwelling
Next day before the sun was high.
Into the silent study, setting
Aside all timid thoughts, forgetting
The world without, Tatyana crept,
And there she stayed ,and wept, and wept.
The volumes at long last succeeding
In catching Tanya’s eye, she took
A glance at many a curious book,
And all seemed dull. But soon the reading
Absorbed the girl, and she was thrown
Headlong into a world unknown.

Onegin’s taste for books had vanished
Long since, but notice if you please
That there were works he never banished
From his affection; they were these:
Lord Byron’s tales, which well consorted
With two or three bright-backed imported
Romances, upon every page
Exhibiting the present age,
And modern man’s true soul divulging:
A creature arid, cold, and vain,
Careless of others’ joy and pain,
In endless reverie indulging,
One whose embittered mind finds zest
In nothing, but can never rest.

Some pages held a sharp incentive
To reading, where a finger-nail
Had marked the place; and, more attentive,
Tatyana scanned them without fail.
She noted, trembling and excited,
What passage, what remark delighted
Onegin, what shrewd line expressed
A thought in which he acquiesced.
She found the margins most appealing:
The pencil-marks he made with care
Upon the pages everywhere
Were all unconsciously revealing:
A cross, a question-mark, a word —
From these the man might be inferred.

Alexander Pushkin, Eugene Onegin (trans. Babette Deutsch)

11:09 am, blithewine
9 notes
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The Temptation and Fall of Eve, 1808  William Blake

The Temptation and Fall of Eve, 1808 
William Blake


11:05 am, blithewine
reblogged
3,770 notes
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turnofthecentury:

Paris, 20 November 1903: the ghostly form of an airship floats past an equally ghostly Eiffel Tower, before a very solid crowd of completely entranced spectators. It is Le Jaune, ‘The Yellow’, the first of the successful Lebaudy series of French semi-rigid airships.
from frenchtwist: mudwerks:Airminded · The Yellow

turnofthecentury:

Paris, 20 November 1903: the ghostly form of an airship floats past an equally ghostly Eiffel Tower, before a very solid crowd of completely entranced spectators. It is Le Jaune, ‘The Yellow’, the first of the successful Lebaudy series of French semi-rigid airships.

from frenchtwist: mudwerks:Airminded · The Yellow


11:42 am, blithewine
reblogged
77 notes
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legrandcirque:

American artist John Singer Sargent in his studio with his painting Portrait of Madame X. Paris, ca. 1884.
Source: Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution

legrandcirque:

American artist John Singer Sargent in his studio with his painting Portrait of Madame X. Paris, ca. 1884.

Source: Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution